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Old 01-02-2004, 10:01 PM   #1
medaldude
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Estonian Regional Soviet Badges

Hello All,

I thought this badge had some connection to Estonia but the colors are a little different from my Estonia deputie's badge. Is it for another republic?

Thanks,

Tom
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Old 01-03-2004, 04:28 AM   #2
Tretov
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My wild guess is that it is a city council badge. The upper word KÛLA sounds very much like the word KYLÄ in finnish, which means village or small town. The word below is deputy or something like that, so the whole thing would be, if my guess is right - city council deputee.

/Patrik
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Old 01-03-2004, 05:27 AM   #3
Christophe
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Seems consistent with what is written on Estonia Soviet Supreme Members badge : "EESTI NSV ÜLEMNOUKOGU", which means "Supreme Soviet of Estonia".

Ch.
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Old 01-26-2004, 06:21 PM   #4
Keith
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Hello,

There were five different types of Soviet in Estonia:

Külanõukogu - Village Soviet
Linnanõukogu - City Soviet
Alevinõukogu - Borough Soviet
Rajooninõukogu - Regional Soviet
ülemnõukogu - Supreme Soviet

The first four I believe all have large and small variations, older ones are brass and hot enamel, newer ones are cold enamel and look weak. Küla is the easiest, then Linna, Rajooni, and Alevi is the most difficult from my experience. The first three would come and go during ESSR, Rajooni- is almost the same as the current counties (maakond) in Estonia, and there was always the same ülemnõukogu.

Keith
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Old 01-26-2004, 08:04 PM   #5
Taz
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Rajooninõukogu - Regional Soviet

Here is the Estonian Regional Soviet Badge.
Eddie
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Old 08-27-2007, 04:08 PM   #6
Niko
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith View Post
Hello,
There were five different types of Soviet in Estonia:
Külanõukogu - Village Soviet
Linnanõukogu - City Soviet
Alevinõukogu - Borough Soviet
Rajooninõukogu - Regional Soviet
ülemnõukogu - Supreme Soviet
The first four I believe all have large and small variations, older ones are brass and hot enamel, newer ones are cold enamel and look weak. Küla is the easiest, then Linna, Rajooni, and Alevi is the most difficult from my experience. The first three would come and go during ESSR, Rajooni- is almost the same as the current counties (maakond) in Estonia, and there was always the same ülemnõukogu.
Keith
Hello, Linnanõukogu - City Soviet. There were 3 different types of City Soviet in Estonia, large and small variations.
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Old 11-15-2011, 07:14 PM   #7
Tretov
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Badge ENSV Regioonide Vaheline Noukogo

During my last trip to Estonia I picked up this interesting Deputy badge. It is not the usual Ülemnoukogo badge for Highest Soviet in Estonian SSR, but according to the seller, a badge for the interregional deputies of Estonia SSR in the early 1990s. Or so I was told. The enamel work is very good but I have not been able to verify the badge itself. The price was good so I took a chance. I have seen it before in a cheaper model, but this has same quality and "weight" as the earlier badges, not lightweight with inferior enamel.

Anyone with knowledge about this badge?
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Old 11-15-2011, 07:26 PM   #8
Tretov
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Re: Badge ENSV Regioonide Vaheline Noukogo

It is actually a little larger than the ENSV deputy badges.
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Old 11-17-2011, 10:28 PM   #9
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Re: Badge ENSV Regioonide Vaheline Noukogo

This badge is for a member of the executive committee of the Intermovement in Estonia. More commonly known as Interrinne, they were the pro soviet counter to Rahvarinne, the Estonian independence movement in the late 80s-early 90s. The leadership was pro Moscow, in line with the pro Moscow Estonian Communist party after the Estonian Communist Party split in two at the ECP 20th Congress in March 1990.

This badge in particular was incredibly rare (around $300-400) until June 2010, when several hundred unissued badges were discovered and released into the market all at once. Current price is around $50, and these are readily available on ebay, etc.

Keith

Below is the wikipedia entry from Intermovement:

The Intermovement (International Movement of Workers in the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic) (Estonian: Interliikumine, Russian: Интердвижение, translit. Interdvizhenie) was a political movement and organisation in the Estonian SSR. It was founded on 19 July 1988 and claimed by different sources 16,000 - 100,000 members. The original name of the movement was Interfront (International Front of Workers in the Estonian Soviet Socialist Republic), which was changed to Intermovement in autumn 1988.

The movement was aligned with the conservative (that is, pro-Soviet) wing of Estonian Communist Party, and opposed the Estonian independence movement led by the nationalistic Popular Front of Estonia and the liberal wing of the CPE. The Intermovement was not perceived as an organisation built on nationalist principles, and gained some support of ethnic Estonians. It also included many supporters from ethnic non-Estonians. The main leader of the movement was Jevgeni Kogan (Russian: Евгений Коган, sometimes transliterated as Evgeny Kogan). Kogan was also one of the leaders of the hardline Soyuz faction in the USSR legislature. Other leaders of the Intermovement included Vladimir Jarovoi (Russian: Владимир Яровой, also transliterated as Vladimir Yarovoi), Arnold Sai, Vladimir Lebedev (Russian: Владимир Лебедев) and economist Konstantin Kiknadze

The Intermovement functioned at factories, mainly, at military plants and those factories that had an all-union importance. A large part of Estonian heavy industry was part of the integrated production chain providing their production to the industries in other Soviet regions. These included e.g. the engine factory Dvigatel, Kalinin's and Pöögelmann's electrotechnical plant Tondi Elektroonika, and the (especially but not only phosphorite) mining industry in Northern Estonia. It was feared that Estonian independence would lead to the loss of jobs. In fact, after independence the industries were forced to restructure their production and re-orient to new markets, which in most of cases drastically reduced production and forced lay off many people, a large number of whom were Soviet-era immigrants.

According to critics, the movement's aim was to protect the conservative Soviet values and make everything possible to block the actions of the Popular Front. According to the former KGB general Oleg Kalugin (Russian: Олег Калугин) it was established in Estonia as also in other parts of the USSR on the initiative of the KGB, as a counterbalance to the Popular Fronts, perceived as nationalist organizations. Despite the stereotyping of the Russophones as a force opposing an Estonian independence movement, the Interfront organizations were never mass movements and their membership was largely confined to members of the Party apparat and plant managers. One of initiators of foundation of the Popular Front R. Grigorjan afterwards gave the following evaluation:

“ One cannot say that everything in the ideas and slogans of the Intermovementians was wrong. Their concerns that Estonian language will be introduced and people will be fired for not speaking it, fulfilled completely. Or, that the Russian-speakers will be deprived of political rights (citizenship) and turn into second-class people, that Russian schools will be closed etc. But, if the leaders of the Intermovement cared really about human rights, one could find common language with them. However, what they thought about weren't people. For them, as well as for the radical nationalists, people were means, not aim. They'd cared about destiny of the CPSU, Soviet Empire, red flag, marxism-leninism etc. ”

In elections for the Congress of People's Deputies of the Soviet Union in 1989 pro-Intermovement candidates won 6 seats out of Estonia's 36, against 27 won by the Popular Front.

From 29 August 1990 to 21 August 1991 the Intermovement ran the radio station Nadezhda (Russian: Надежда, meaning 'Hope'), which contrary to the ordinary procedure got its license from the central authorities of the Soviet Union without informing local authorities in Estonia. Following an order by the Soviet Defense Minister Dmitry Yazov, the radio station was installed at the territory of the Soviet military base in Keila, near Tallinn.

In 1993 Estonian state adopted a law on citizenship and residency, based on Jus sanguinis. Under the new law, approximately 500,000 ethnic Russians living in Estonia were to be regarded foreigners. Some raised concerns that the new foreigners would face possible expulsion from Estonian territory; however, these concerns were not based in fact and in general, Soviet-era non-citizen immigrants were furnished with long-term residence permits.

Ostensibly in response to the government's actions, Juri Mišin and a few other former activists of the Intermovement made demands of regional autonomy for Estonia's Russian minority, seeking autonomy of the ethnic Russian dominated areas in North-East Estonia.

Activists held an unconstitutional plebiscite on this matter in the Narva region. Some raised concerns that the central government might use force to prevent the plebiscite, but these concerns were not based in fact, and it tookplace on July 16–July 17, 1993. According to the activist commissions in Narva and Sillamäe, 53.2% percent of voters participated and 98% in total (97.2% in Narva). However, the central government determined the majority of the population did not participate, and demanded the Narva city council, which had provided material support to separatists, to disband.

The Intermovement was not built on ethnic principles and had some ethnic Estonian supporters. However, of the 742 delegates attending the first congress on March 5, 1989, only 11 were ethnic Estonian. It was supported by Gustav Naan and Vladimir Hütt; Intermovements ranks also included Arnold Sai, Lembit Annus and Valter Toots. Similar organisations existed in Latvia, Lithuania (called 'Yedinstvo' - 'Unity') and Moldavia. They shared orthodox communist views and struggled for preserving the Soviet Union. Being committed to the USSR's territorial integrity, they forged alliances with Russian nationalist organizations. Pyotr Rozhok, a participant of the Intermovement, became a LDPRF politician in 1990s before running as Stalinist Bloc candidate in Russian legislative election, 1999.
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Old 11-18-2011, 05:41 AM   #10
Tretov
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Re: Badge ENSV Regioonide Vaheline Noukogo

Thanks Keith!! :thumbsup:thumbsup

However - I have never seen this badge on eBay and actually only two pieces in total in Tallinn. I like the piece though so even if there are a vast number floating around, I guess they will dry up. This one goes into the collection.
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