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General And Slightly Off Topic Talk Forum for exchanging ideas and talking about general issues without straying too far off topic.

View Poll Results: Repair or not
Leave the damn thing alone! Don't mess with what looks like a period repair 12 54.55%
Have the solder removed to make the serial number readable 9 40.91%
Repair the enamel only 0 0%
Remove the solder AND repair the enamel 1 4.55%
Voters: 22. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 06-26-2002, 01:19 PM   #31
mcwirsk
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Dear Alexei

When I buy from dealer I like the medals to be as "original" as possible.

One point that I did not make is that there is a big difference between polishing and cleaning. If the awards are polished then they will lose value. I will only clean an item- not polish it.

I am traveling this weekend to the Far east again and will be visiting a coin dealer in the Philipines. He is an expert at repairing silver coins and medals. He is so good that you will never know the item has been repaired. He also tones them again and basically when you buy from him you know the item is tampered with.

When I sell my collection to you one day I will ask him to tone them for you..... just joking.

regards

Munroe
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Old 06-26-2002, 01:20 PM   #32
Nota Bene
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Somebody had to clean this one. I think it's ruined. Just my oppinion, of course.

Alexei
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Old 06-26-2002, 01:22 PM   #33
mcwirsk
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Dear Alexei

Toothpaste with a SOFT toothbrush works like a dream - I guarantee you that you will not damage the item. You use lots of water and get the paste to foam a lot. Do not apply a lot of pressure - just be gentle. If there is gold plating - you must be careful. Also be careful if there is enamel.

But it works well and gives a nice blue color to the silver.

try it and let me know

regards

Munroe
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Old 06-26-2002, 01:29 PM   #34
mcwirsk
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Guys

Does any know what the offical regulations in the Soviet Union are for cleaning medals and orders. Is it the armed forces policy that medals will be clean for parades.

In the Britsih army you would be on orders if you wore the wrong items or your medals were not clean. A while ago the cavalry/mounted units also had a different way of wearing the awards.

I ask this becuase certain awards have a natural black effect to them.

Also I ahve some pictures of officers wearing their awards in what appears to be reverse order...

regards

Munroe
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Old 06-26-2002, 01:37 PM   #35
Nota Bene
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Dear Munroe,

I agree there is a big difference between cleaning and polishing. In numismatics rubbin an applicator against coin surface is considered polishing.

I've been collecting coins for more then 30 years, and over the years I have tried just about everything to clean silver, bronze and other alloys. Boy, did I make some expensive mistakes! I have two proof coins from the 1980 Russian Olimpics series, that had some tarnish on them. I have decided to clean with very mild toothpaste solution and a q-tip, and they were runined, because toothpaste has abrasive particles, under magnification I could see some deep scrathes on the polished surface.

I am also against cleaning unless it is absolutely necessary to save an item from even more damage, f.i. to remove that green stuff from a bronze coin.

The general rule is that patina on collectibles, like coins or medals, adds to their beauty and attests to their age. But like I mantioned, in the end it's a matter of personal taste and preference.

Alexei
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Old 06-26-2002, 02:04 PM   #36
mcwirsk
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Dear Alexei

You should have let the Philipine guy clean your coins... just joking.

I agree with that its personal preference. I clean all my British and South Africa stuff. I no longer clean (on re ribbon) all my soviet stuff becuase everyone make a fuss about the patina. So if the item is really nicely toned I leave it alone.

regards
Munroe
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Old 06-27-2002, 10:14 AM   #37
new world
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Example of cleaning

If a veteran was cleaning his awrds for many years - then there's risk that the goldplating will be all wiped off. In that case - how do you determine whether it's 3rd class or 2nd?

I saw an example of everyday cleaning on eBay, when Glories were polished/cleaned so extensively that they are almost ruined.

If you were to be offerd this 2nd class Glory separate from the group - how would you tell that it is indeed 2nd class?

New World

PS - image belongs to Dave
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Old 07-17-2002, 03:13 AM   #38
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Restoring Damaged Certificates.

I received a couple of A4 sized certificates that came with a medal. They are somewhat crumpled and a little torn around the edges. I was wondering how I could straighten these out, ready for framing. I have through of laminating them, but I'm not sure this is a great idea. Any suggestions?

Kind Regards,
Shane Cook.
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Old 07-17-2002, 06:34 AM   #39
McLenin
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document restoration

Hi Shane
I have had a couple of medal documents (Stalingrad, Caucasus, Leningrad type) "stablilized" by a professional document restorer. I did not want them completely restored (thus losing character) but didn't want them to deteriorate any further either. I was happy with the results.
You could try putting your documents in a plastic folder, carefully flattening out the edges and then press them under a pile of books or something (I have done that too). Personally I would NEVER laminate them.

Originally I went to the document restorer to see if I could have bad Order Book entries removed but they couldn't help with that. Anyone had more success of this front? How about tattoo-removing lasers to fade the ink?
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Old 07-17-2002, 04:37 PM   #40
Art
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Here is how I "restore" my documents.

1. Obtain archival quality card stock ( you can buy this stuff from a photo supply store, or visit light impressions on the Web, I mentioned the URL on the forum before so search for it here )

2. Lay card stock on hard surface ( Non-Archival quality cardstock is a no-no. There are chemicals which can leach into the document) place document on cardstock cut 1/4" bigger than document on all sides. Carefully place the document centered and face-up on the card-stock. Try to unfold any folded over creases. Place an identical piece of card-stock on top of the document. Place alot of weight on top of this. I use 5 or 6 encyclopedias.

3. Let sit 24 hours. Remove books and top piece of cardstock. Carefully loosen the document form the bottom piece of cardstock. You don't want the document to get stuck to the cardstock becuase of the weight that was put on it. After document is free, lay the document on a fresh piece of cardstock the same size.

4. Find a suitable Mylar-D sleeve to place the document and cardstock inside. You can get these at the same place the cardstock was purchased at. Always use Mylar-D, nothing else. Mylar-D is used by museums worldwide for such things. It doesn't contain additives which can be transferred to the document.


That's it!
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