1862 CONFEDERATE BROADSIDE ISSUED BY NEW ORLEANS MAYOR JOHN T. MONROE CIVIL WAR For Sale

1862 CONFEDERATE BROADSIDE ISSUED BY NEW ORLEANS MAYOR JOHN T. MONROE CIVIL WAR


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1862 CONFEDERATE BROADSIDE ISSUED BY NEW ORLEANS MAYOR JOHN T. MONROE CIVIL WAR :
$20,000

"Mayoralty of New Orleans,CITY HALL, April 25th, 1862. After an obstinate and heroic defence by our troops on the river, there appears to be imminent danger that the insolvent enemy will succeed in capturing your city. The forts have not fallen; they have not succumbed even beneath the terrors of a bombardment unparalleled in the history of warfare. Their defenders have done all that becomes men fighting for their homes, their country and their liberty; but in spite of their efforts, the ships of the enemy have been able to avoid them, and now threaten the city. In view of this contingency, I call on you to be calm, to meet the enemy, not with submissiveness nor with indecent alacrity; but if the military authorities are unable longer to defend you, to await with hope and confidence the inevitable moment when the valor of your sons and of your fellow-countrymen will achieve your deliverance. I shall remain among you, to protect you and your property, so far as my power or authority as Chief Magistrate can avail. JOHN T. MONROE,MAYOR." [CONFEDERATE IMPRINT] TO THE PEOPLE OF NEW ORLEANS. Rare broadside, by New Orleans Mayor John T. (Tomkins) Monroe, April 25, 1862, in which he addresses the citizens of the Crescent City just prior to its capitulation to Federal forces. Single leaf, measures approx. 17 x 11 1/4 inches.19 1/4 x 13 3/8 inches in frame. Recent conservation: paper deacidified, minor repair; mounted on acid-free buffered board.The bombardment and capture of New Orleans, as well as the naval blockade of the major Confederate commercial ports along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, were integral components of Union General Winfred Scott's "Anaconda Plan" to suffocate the Southern economy by seizing control of the Mississippi River and splitting the Confederacy into two isolated regions. New Orleans, a center of international trade, was protected by a chain of fortresses near the mouth of the Mississippi, including Fort Jackson and Fort St. Philip. On April 24, 1862, Union Flag Officer David Farragut commenced a fierce naval bombardment of these forts. With their surrender, which left the city of New Orleans largely defenseless, Farragut proceeded north to advance on the city. With the prospect of defeat approaching rapidly, General Mansfield Lovell, the Confederate commander in New Orleans, decided to evacuate more than 3,000 troops without a confrontation with the Union military forces. Lowell transferred the city's legal authority to Mayor John T. Monroe, a secessionist and Confederate supporter, to negotiate the terms of surrender to Union forces.When Admiral David Farragut and his fleet neared the city docks on April 28, the Union commander sent Mayor Monroe a note demanding "the unqualified surrender of the city, and the emblem of the sovereignty of the United States shall be hoisted over the city hall, mint, and custom-house." New Orleans was given 48 hours to comply or the city would be fired upon. Mayor Monroe defiantly responded: "We stand by your bombardment, unarmed and undefended as we are. The civilized world will consign to indelible infamy the heart that will conceive the deed and the hand that will dare to consummate it." The following day Farragut informed Monroe that with the surrender of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, the city was under Union control. He ordered the mayor to "haul down and suppress every ensign and symbol of government, whether State or Confederate." Farragut then sent a Marine detachment with two howitzers ashore to remove the Louisiana secession flag from the roof of the customs house. Monroe would later be imprisoned for his defiant response to Beast Butler's infamous Order No. 28 and refusing to take the oath of allegiance. He was again elected Mayor of New Orleans upon the close of the Civil War, serving in that capacity for a year before he was deposed by Gen. Sheridan under the Reconstruction Act of Congress. JUMONVILLE 3266, P&W 3275


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