EXCEPTIONAL 10TH-CENTURY VIKING SWORD, DECORATED, GILDED HILT AND ORIGINAL GRIP For Sale

EXCEPTIONAL 10TH-CENTURY VIKING SWORD, DECORATED, GILDED HILT AND ORIGINAL GRIP
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EXCEPTIONAL 10TH-CENTURY VIKING SWORD, DECORATED, GILDED HILT AND ORIGINAL GRIP:
$5400.00

EXCEPTIONAL 10TH-CENTURY VIKING SWORD WITH DECORATED GILDED HILT AND ORIGINAL WOODEN GRIP:This stunning and well-preserved swordwould be a great addition to any collection.

Discussion:Under the Petersen typology ( see pages 236 – 243 in my book), this sword would be classified as style O. This typology is dateable on archaeological grounds to the 10th century (900-950 AD). This typology of swords has mostly been found in Norway but also turns up elsewhere, including the Baltic region.

Construction:The pommel, upper, and lower guard are made of a copper alloy, almost certainly bronze, gilded (possibly refreshed), and decorated with Norse rune designs.Norse runes werecreated as a writing system by the Germanic people living in Scandinavia. Runic symbols were believed to contain mystical powers.Since copper alloy is a noble metal, it is exceptionally well preserved compared to the blade of low-carbon steel. The blade is in a good state of preservation. The blade with a slight tapering at the tip. Many of the grips used on these types of swords were made with organic materials, which resulted in quick disintegration from the ravages of time.The grip on this sword has retained what appears to be its original wooden grip.

Discussion:A Viking’s sword was an immensely valuable object, passed down through families as an heirloom, and was probably the most expensive item that a Viking could own. For example, from the hundreds of items found in Viking burials in Iceland, only sixteen are swords; they are more common in other parts of the Viking world, especially in Norway, but were still a high-status item. A sword given by the king of Norway from 934 to 961 CE (King Haakon the Good) to an Icelander by the name of Hoskuldur in the Laxdaela Saga was valued at a half mark of gold, the equivalent value of sixteen cows.

Conclusion:The Vikings have created an infamous reputation that appeals to collectors. This is anopportunity to own an important piece of Viking history. All collections should have at least one early sword in their collection; this could be it.ACT NOW-

YOU ARE BUYING WITH COMPLETE CONFIDENCE:All my items come with a review period.



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